Tag Archives: Pavlin D. Mitev

CO2 Hydration Shell Structure and Transformation

Authors: Samual R. Zukowski, Pavlin D. Mitev, Kersti Hermansson, and Dor Ben-Amotz

The hydration-shell of CO2 is characterized using Raman multivariate curve resolution (Raman-MCR) spectroscopy combined with ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) vibrational density of states simulations, to validate our assignment of the experimentally observed high-frequency OH band to a weak hydrogen bond between water and CO2. Our results reveal that while the hydration-shell of CO2 is highly tetrahedral, it is also occasionally disrupted by the presence of entropically stabilized defects associated with the CO2-water hydrogen bond. Moreover, we find that the hydration-shell of CO2 undergoes a temperature-dependent structural transformation to a highly disordered (less tetrahedral) structure, reminiscent of the transformation that takes place at higher temperatures around much larger oily molecules. The biological significance of the CO2 hydration shell structural transformation is suggested by the fact that it takes place near physiological temperatures.

J. Phys. Chem. Lett., 8 (13), 2017, pp 2971–2975
DOI: 10.1021/acs.jpclett.7b00971

Comparing van der Waals DFT methods for water on NaCl(001) and MgO(001)

Authors: Getachew G. Kebede, Daniel Spångberg, Pavlin D. Mitev, Peter Broqvist, and   Kersti Hermansson

In this work, a range of van der Waals type density functionals are applied to the H2O/NaCl(001) and H2O/MgO(001) interface systems to explore the effect of an explicit dispersion treatment. The functionals we use are the self-consistent vdW functionals vdW-DF, vdW-DF2, optPBE-vdW, optB88-vdW, optB86b-vdW, and vdW-DF-cx, as well as the dispersion-corrected PBE-TS and PBE-D2 methods; they are all compared with the standard PBE functional. For both NaCl(001) and MgO(001), we find that the dispersion-flavoured functionals stabilize the water-surface interface by approximately 20%-40% compared to the PBE results. For NaCl(001), where the water molecules remain intact for all overlayers, the dominant contribution to the adsorption energy from “density functional theory dispersion” stems from the water-surface interactions rather than the water-water interactions. The optPBE-vdW and vdW-DF-cx functionals yield adsorption energies in good agreement with available experimental values for both NaCl and MgO. To probe the strengths of the perturbations of the adsorbed water molecules, we also calculated water dipole moments and found an increase up to 85% for water at the MgO(001) surface and 70% at the NaCl(001) surface, compared to the gas-phase dipole moment.

The Journal of Chemical Physics 146, 064703 (2017);
doi: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4971790

H-bond and electric field correlations for water in highly hydrated crystals

Authors: Anik Sen, Pavlin D. Mitev, Anders Eriksson, and Kersti Hermansson

H2O-EFWe present periodic plane-wave density functional theory (DFT) Perdew–
Burke–Ernzerhof (PBE-D2) calculations for four highly hydrated crystals, Na2CO3·10H2O, MgSO4·7H2O, MgSO4·11H2O, and Al(NO3)3·9H2O, containing 37 structurally unique water molecules and 74 unique hydrogen bonds. The calculated R(H···O) distances lie in the range 1.60–2.05 Å, the anharmonic OH frequencies in the range 2570–3425 cm−1, and the water dipole moments lie in the range 2.9–4.3 Debye, as calculated from the Wannier function centers and the nuclei. We present the following findings. (i) Our optimized intramolecular r(OH) distances are always larger than the gas-phase value and thus more accurate than those derived from neutron diffraction experiments; (ii) The local in situ electric field over the molecule, calculated from the positions of the nuclei and the Wannier centers in the surrounding crystal, appears to be a good descriptor of the pertturbation from the water molecule’s surroundings as the internal molecular properties (re, ν, μ) are found to correlate well with the crystal-generated electric field; (iii) We have added DFT-calculated data points to the well-known experimental ‘OH frequency versus R(H···O)’ correlation curve in a region where the experimental data points are scarce; (iv) For all 37 water molecules, the Wannier centers located in the lone-pair region, and those located in the OH bonds, displace about equally much due to the polarizing environment. Finally, we propose that our resulting ‘OH frequency versus Wannier-type electric field’ correlation curve may constitute a useful tool for predicting OH vibrational frequencies from snapshots from PBE-D2-based ab initio molecular dynamics simulations of water-containing systems.

International Journal of Quantum Chemistry, 116, ( 2016), 67-80
DOI: 10.1002/qua.25022

Vibrational models for a crystal with 36 water molecules in the unit cell: IR spectra from experiment and calculation

Authors: Pavlin D. Mitev, Anders Eriksson, Jean-François Boily and Kersti Hermansson

c5cp00390c-f6We present experimental and calculated IR spectra of the water molecules in crystalline aluminium nitrate nonahydrate and a method to generate a realistic and well resolved isotope-isolated spectrum from periodic DFT calculations. Our sample crystal contains 18 structurally different OH groups and is a perfect benchmark compound to validate vibrational models and the structure–property relationship of bound water molecules. FTIR spectra (ATR technique) were recorded for the Al(NO3)3·9H2O crystal at 138 and 298 K, and due to a multitude of OH contributions and couplings, they are naturally poorly resolved and yield a broad OH band in the range 3500 to 2700 cm−1 at both temperatures. Isotope-isolated IR spectra have the clear advantage over non-deuterated spectra that they are better resolved and easier to interpret – here we have extended the experimental study by simulating the isotope-isolated IR spectrum, using PBE-D2 and auxiliary B3LYP calculations and an anharmonic OH vibrational model. We find excellent agreement between the shapes and frequency ranges of the experimental and calculated OH spectral bands. We make use of four different vibrational models: (i) a harmonic lattice-dynamical model for the isotope-isolated crystal with 1 H among 71 D, (ii) a harmonic lattice-dynamical model for the normal undeuterated crystal involving all the vibrational couplings, (iii) a harmonic 1-dimensional uncoupled OH vibrational model, and (iv) the anharmonic variant of the previous model, which yields the final spectrum. We also use the individual frequencies, resolved by the calculations, to quantify new or extended relationships involving OH frequencies versus local electric fields and H-bond distances. We explore the correlation between OH frequency and molecular dipole moment for bound water molecules.

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2015, 17, 10520-10531
DOI: 10.1039/C5CP00390C

Oxygen Vacancies versus Fluorine at CeO2(111): A Case of Mistaken Identity?

Authors: J. Kullgren, M. J. Wolf, C. W. M. Castleton, P. D. Mitev, W. J. Briels, and K. Hermansson

mediumWe propose a resolution to the puzzle presented by the surface defects observed with STM at the (111) surface facet of CeO2 single crystals. In the seminal paper of Esch et al. [Science 309, 752 (2005)] they were identified with oxygen vacancies, but the observed behavior of these defects is inconsistent with the results of density functional theory (DFT) studies of oxygen vacancies in the literature. We resolve these inconsistencies via DFT calculations of the properties of both oxygen vacancies and fluorine impurities at CeO2(111), the latter having recently been shown to exist in high concentrations in single crystals from a widely used commercial source of such samples. We find that the simulated filled-state STM images of surface-layer oxygen vacancies and fluorine impurities are essentially identical, which would render problematic their experimental distinction by such images alone. However, we find that our theoretical results for the most stable location, mobility, and tendency to cluster, of fluorine impurities are consistent with experimental observations, in contrast to those for oxygen vacancies. Based on these results, we propose that the surface defects observed in STM experiments on CeO2 single crystals reported heretofore were not oxygen vacancies, but fluorine impurities. Since the similarity of the simulated STM images of the two defects is due primarily to the relative energies of the 2p states of oxygen and fluorine ions, this confusion might also occur for other oxides which have been either doped or contaminated with fluorine.

Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 156102
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.156102

Large polarization but small electron transfer for water around Al3+ in a highly hydrated crystal

Authors: Pavlin D. Mitev, Imre Bakó, Anders Eriksson and Kersti Hermansson

 

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Precise molecular-level information on the water molecule is precious, since it affects our interpretation of the role of water in a range of important applications of aqueous media. Here we propose that electronic structure calculations for highly hydrated crystals yield such information. Properties of nine structurally different water molecules (19 independent OO hydrogen bonds) in the Al(NO3)3·9H2O crystal have been calculated from DFT calculations. We combine the advantage of studying different water environments using one and the same compound and method (instead of comparing a set of independent experiments, each with its own set of errors) with the advantage of knowing the exact atomic positions, and the advantage of calculating properties that are difficult to extract from experiment. We find very large Wannier dipole moments for H2O molecules surrounding the cations: 4.0–4.3 D (compared to our calculated value of 1.83 D in the gas phase). These are induced by the ions and the H-bonds, while other water interactions and the relaxation of the internal water geometry in fact decrease the dipole moments. We find a good correlation between the water dipole moment and the OO distances, and an even better (non-linear) correlation with the average electric field over the molecule. Literature simulation data for ionic aqueous solutions fit quite well with our crystalline ‘dipole moment vs. OO distance’ curve. The progression of the water and cation charges from ‘small clusterslarge clustersthe crystal’ helps explain why the net charges on all the water molecules are so small in the crystal.

Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2014, 16, 9351-9363

DOI: 10.1039/C3CP55358B

Different structures give similar vibrational spectra: The case of OH− in aqueous solution

Authors: Pavlin D. Mitev, Philippe A. Bopp, Jasmina Petreska, Kaline Coutinho, Hans Ågren, Ljupco Pejov, and Kersti Hermansson

We have calculated the anp5aharmonic OH(aq) vibrational spectrum in aqueous solution with a “classical Monte Carlo simulation + QM/MM + vibrational” sequential approach. A new interaction model was used in the Monte Carlo simulations: a modified version of the charged-ring hydroxide-water model from the literature. This spectrum is compared with experiment and with a spectrum based on CPMD-generated structures, and the hydration structures and H-bonding for the two models are compared. We find that: (i) the solvent-induced frequency shift as well as the absolute OH frequency are in good agreement with experiment using the two models; (ii) the Raman and IR bands are very similar, in agreement with experiment; (iii) the hydration structure and H-bonding around the ion are very different with the two ion-water interaction models (charged-ring and CPMD); (iv) a cancellation effect between different regions of the hydration shell makes the total spectra similar for the two interaction models, although their hydration structures are different; (v) the net OH frequency shift is a blueshift of about +80 cm−1 with respect to frequency of the gas-phase ion.

J. Chem. Phys. 138, 064503 (2013);
http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4775589

The vibrating hydroxide ion in water

Kersti Hermansson, Philippe A. Bopp, Daniel Spångberg, Ljupco Pejov, Imre Bakó, Pavlin D. Mitev

scienceThe OH ion in water is studied using a CPMD/BLYP + QMelectronic + QMvibrational approach. The ion resides in a cage of water molecules, which are H-bonded among each other, and pinned by H-bonding to the ion’s O atom. The water network keeps the ‘on-top’ water in place, despite the fact that this particular ion-water pair interaction is non-binding. The calculated OH vibrational peak maximum is at ∼3645 cm−1 (experiment ∼3625 cm−1) and the shift with respect to the gas-phase is ∼ +90 cm−1 (experiment +70 cm−1). The waters molecules on each side of the ion (O and H) induce a substantial OH vibrational blueshift, but the net effect is much smaller than the sum. A parabolic ‘frequency-field’ relation qualitatively explains this non-additivity. The calculated ‘in-liquid’ ν(OH) anharmonicity is 85 cm−1.

Chemical Physics Letters, Vol. 514, 2011, Pages 1–15
http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cplett.2011.07.042